Programme: Future Cities Africa (FCA) - Developing Action Plans and Tools for Sustainable Growth

Project

At-a-Glance

Approval Date
Proposal Focus
1471
Core Focus
Secondary Cities
Country Type
Ethiopia

Detail

Summary
The UK’s £4.915 million will fund a project to support at least 8 cities in Africa to become future proofed to climate, environment and natural resource challenges, so that they are inclusive and resilient, and have growing economies. It will help make cities work for the urban poor. It will conduct an in depth feasibility and scoping study and develop innovative tools to enable rapidly growing African cities to realise their potential as centres of growth and job creation; use research and evidence to develop targeted urban action plans; and will deliver research new research to fill data and evidence gaps to maximise sustainable economic growth to enable future programming The project will involve in depth consultation with urban local authorities, other donors and development actors and research institutions and will deliver outcomes for cities in four African countries (likely to include four of Ethiopia, DRC, Tanzania, Nigeria, Ghana, Uganda, Kenya, Mozambique and Malawi). The tools and knowledge generated in this project could also be used more widely, to develop and design a scaled up intervention to provide comprehensive support and targeted investment in a greater number of African cities.
Objectives
The Business Case and Intervention Summary (BCIS) and Logframe provide the rationale and overall purpose, outputs and outcomes expected of the FCA project. Specifically, UK funding of the FCA project will: “…support at least 8 cities in Africa to become future proofed to climate, environment and natural resource challenges, so that they are inclusive and resilient, and have growing economies. It will help make cities work for the urban poor. It will conduct an in depth feasibility and scoping study and develop innovative tools to enable rapidly growing African cities to realise their potential as centres of growth and job creation; use research and evidence to develop targeted urban action plans; and will deliver new research to fill data and evidence gaps to maximise sustainable economic growth.” (BCIS, p.1).
Activities
? A feasibility study to determine in which countries and then in which cities the programme should focus. It is anticipated that the project will work in at least 2 cities in each country. The long list of countries is currently: Ethiopia, DRC, Tanzania, Nigeria, Ghana, Uganda, Kenya, Mozambique and Malawi. The principal criterion for selection will be the extent to which the programme is likely to have a catalytic impact on the cities / countries, as indicated by the level of buy-in of key stakeholders, and current risks and opportunities in the cities studied. Having chosen the cities, the study would then set out: (a) the context for intervention and possible future programming, including the enabling environment, implementation partners, potential sources of funding, knowledge gaps and governance arrangements, and highlight high quality and readily available technical assistance and capacity building services that could be used to implement a programme and, (b) the priority interventions required to support cities realise their potential as centres of growth and job creation in the face of climate, resource and environmental risks. ? Research to improve the evidence base and fill data gaps, to enable African cities to fulfil their potential as centres of growth and job creation in the face of climate, environment and resource challenges. An extended Future Proofing Cities report focussing on African cities will be undertaken to dig deeper into the risks and capacity to act in the selected cities. The project will also support the identification and scoping of new research, and will work with African urban research institutes to source additional funding, and then deliver the research. Research will include the gathering of demographic, economic, climate, environmental and resource related data which in many African cities does not exist or is patchy at best and will be used to populate the decision making model and to support the ongoing process of urban research and data gathering. ? Three discrete research studies, focused on a particular thematic issue, or a specific city or country challenge that explore new ideas and innovative thinking. One of these will be focused on specific issues related to cities’ capacity to support sustainable growth and job creation (e.g. land markets, planning, connectivity, infrastructure financing and / or the business environment); one on climate, environment and resource risks; and the third on a topic to be established during the project. ? A fully functioning prototype of an innovative urban/rural open source decision making model, developed by the Ecological Sequestration Trust, for use in possible future urban programming in Africa and elsewhere, which will be piloted in the cities covered by this project, to enable decision-makers and key stakeholders to design better city-wide policies, plans and interventions, available and ready for deployment in African cities. The model will integrate satellite data, demographic and other data gathered through the research components of this project and resource flows to enable city decision makers to consider a number of options for planning. It will enable planners to test future investment and resource management strategies and to anticipate changes in population, consumption and patterns of urbanisation. The usefulness of this tool to African city authorities will depend upon it being: (a) simple enough for city level staff who have not benefitted from an advanced level of information technology training to use; (b) functional using the technology available to city authorities in Africa. The model is used to support a multi-stakeholder collaborative approach that is currently being tested in Mongolia with evidence of greater than usual collaboration, from HM Ambassador, who has observed enthusiastic participation of the public sector and civil society in ways he had not previously witnessed20. ? A knowledge sharing platform to share results, data, and make peer-to-peer contact between cities. The platform, piloted for use in possible future programmes, will enable people with similar roles to connect with each other so that they can learn from each other and will enable cities to track KPIs across sectors and compare their performance with that of other cities. . The platform will also be used to monitor KPIs of any development programmes within and between cities enabling evidence based learning. The platform will be used to operationalise managing for development results (MfDR) within beneficiary cities, to ensure impactful use of DFID funds (efficiency) and to mentor cities for effectiveness. The use of the knowledge sharing platform and methodology will capture re-usable knowledge and best practices as one or more checklist/monitoring templates. Checklists are proven in quality management to be a tool for mass capacity building and large scale improvement. The knowledge sharing platform cost is approximately 4% of the of the programme budget, but will produce knowledge assets which are of value to cities in the long term and to any African city addressing urbanisation and climate change. It is anticipated that the following results would be delivered under the International Climate Fund KPIs: - Improved capacity of 4 African countries to tackle climate change - Increase in number and quality of climate change related knowledge products: a prototype decision making model; a knowledge sharing platform; research studies providing evidence / data; 3 innovative studies. - Transformational impact – this project should lay the ground work for transformational improvements in specific cities, but also for a larger response to cities across Africa. Corresponding growth / job creation KPIs are: - Improved capacity of municipal authorities in eight African cities to plan and manage the cities in which they work in ways that promote sustained growth and job creation. - Increase in number of knowledge products to support sustainable growth and job creation in the face of climate, environment and resource risks in African cities: a prototype decision making model; a knowledge sharing platform; evidence / data; 3 studies. Other indicators - Number of cities that make use of the tools and studies produced through this programme. Outcomes of the programme will also have use in a wide range of African cities beyond the eight cities which are the focus of the programme.
Expected Impacts and Results
Outcome At least 8 cities in 4 countries in Africa have the tools and information they need to develop and implement future-proofing and growth action plans. These cities are clear on what their specific planning and economic challenges related to urbanisation are, and are ready to deliver improvements for their existing and future urban populations. They have partners in place and have identified and are filling evidence gaps, and are using the knowledge sharing and decision making tools. They are accessing technical assistance finance to put this into action. Impact Cities in Africa take new actions to become future-proofed to climate, environment and natural resource challenges, such that they are inclusive and resilient, and have growing economies, with better services, opportunities and quality of life.